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quahogwi - n/a
25-Jun-06, 04:11 PM
What are the preferred, or most commonly used materials to make finger skirt segments, and why?



Here in the USA it seenms to be the following:



1. Hypalon coated nylon. Slightly better abrasion and weather resistance than neoprene, but more costly.



2. Neoprene coated Nylon. A strong relatively inexpensive black fabric with good abrasion resistance.



3. Nylon "pack cloth". A 400 denier nylon, 3/4oz urethane coating (one side only). Considerably less expensive than Hypalon (5.00USD vs 35.00USD per yard)



4. Vinyl coated nylon. A strong, very inexpensive fabric. Seemingly rarely used for other than bag skirts.



5. Cordura(tm). A 500 denier nylon, 1oz urethane coating (one side only). Only slightly more expensive than "pack cloth". It has significantly better abrasion resistance than "pack cloth". I've not heard of this used for skirts before, but I am going to try it.





What say you, one and all?

tonybroad - n/a
26-Jun-06, 07:59 AM
Neoprene coated nylon is the favourite in the UK for segmented skirts - there are various weights 4oz - 7oz - heavier for cruising and lighter grades for racing



it all a balance between weight, wear resistance and tear resistance and it seems to do OK on all aspects



hope that helps



Tony

jon_curtis - n/a
26-Jun-06, 06:18 PM
defo no courdura!



most of my skirt is neoprene coated, double sided.



i experiment with small bits of fabric, (cheap as you can get off cuts)then replace just the tips of a segment, couple inches above the wear area. triangle shape.

put these at different places on the craft, front, corners,back etc. and see which are wearing best.



if you can get neoprene, use that.

quahogwi - n/a
27-Jun-06, 02:03 PM
Could you explain why not Cordura? 400 denier nylon pack cloth (3/4oz urethane coated one side) is commonly used here in the US by individuals and by some hovercraft manufacturers. The 500 denier Cordura (1oz urethane coated one side) is also nylon and is tougher than plain nylon. I know only what I read at this point, so I'm really interested in why Cordura is somthing to be avoided.



Neoprene would be nice, but is quite a bit more expensive than the Cordura. At this time cost is a big factor for me.

jon_curtis - n/a
28-Jun-06, 05:49 PM
courdura is, heavy weave fabric with a coating on one side.

the coating will seperate from the fabric, and the weave of the fabric is such that it will fray and wear, very quick. we used it to make bags and ruck sacks. pants for a hover skirt. it wont last long.



havent got a clue what pack cloth is, but it dont sound right.



one side coated neoprene is good, but not as good as double sided coating.



you might think you are saving a bit of money buying cheap stuff, at first, but you will replace it quicker.

assume you are gona sew this your self? you wont wana make another skirt ever again after spending hour after hour after hour with a poxy sewing machine on the coffee table lol.

quahogwi - n/a
28-Jun-06, 07:27 PM
thank you for the reply.



Pack cloth is a nylon cloth similar to Cordura, but with smoother yarns/threads. It, like Cordura, is urethane coated one side, only 3/4oz rather than the Cordura's 1oz. The pack cloth is a 400 denier (thread thickness) as compared to the Cordura's 500 denier. The coarser Cordura is, I think, more in the realm of 1000 denier. This gives it that coarse texture. The 500 denier Cordura is a finer thread and is a very tightly packed weave barely distinguishable from the 400D pack cloth.



Bag skirts seem to predominate the hovercraft world here in the USofA, expecially for cruising. Racing craft seem to be relatively even divided with fingers slightly higher.



This weekend passed the Hover Club of America held it's annual Hover Rally. I wish I could have been there. I'm told that Steve Pope's new racer is equiped with finger segments made of Cordura. While they are relatively new skirt segments, I'm told that he is quite pleased with them ... so far, that is.



Anyway, thanks for the info.



Dave Brown