PDA

View Full Version : To all Sev's



atters
20-Oct-09, 11:55 AM
I am looking for pics of Sevtec dash and steering examples.

Not sure what I want to do yet.

Post a pic of your craft and maybe give us an idea of how it works for you as well as what you would have done different.

thanks guys

John Robertson
20-Oct-09, 02:37 PM
The dash design is really up to you - it depends on exactly what you want on the panel (probably not very much is needed!). Make it sloping so you can see everything whilst sitting.

By far the easiest (and cheapest!) way to make a steering system is to use the handlebar pivot tube from a bicycle. It's lightweight, smooth and durable. The alternative is a length of tubing (conduit or ali) and a couple of HDPE blocks as bearings and mounts (check your plans). Whether you use handlebars or a steering wheel is personal preference - both work well but make sure a steering wheel is lightweight.

This version uses the remnants of the front wheel forks and the bike tube frame to mount the cables:
4185


Note the bolt used as a travel limiter - you must have one at both the steering wheel AND rudder end of the system to avoid damaging the cables

Fixed throttles are the way to go in a cruising craft to avoid "finger fatigue" on long trips.

curtis5420
20-Oct-09, 06:35 PM
if twin engine a fixed lift throttle (maybe gear selector twist grip) is the way to go!

this dash is 1/4" ply covered in skirt material, bike yoke handle bar (similar to johns) but upright handles (to give that aircraft feel) :)

Ian Brooks
20-Oct-09, 07:30 PM
Hi

This is the dashboard of my Surveyor - cool, eh?

4192






Ok ok just dreaming...

Dash is 1/2" foam covered in 6oz cloth, cut to shape and supports the foredeck.

4187

Behind this is a second piece of 1/2" foam-cloth. Both these had large hole drilled in (holesaw) to accept nylon bushes as bearings for a steering column made out of tube. (Also note the tow point at the front - alum re-inforcing plate. Fit one now or regret it later!)

4188

Tow point - front:

4189

Rear:

4190

Handlebars - a regular bicycle swansneck fits directly on the steering tube.

4191

Ian

atters
21-Oct-09, 07:12 AM
I like that one with all the lights and switches.

The steering idea is also practical, will have to do that too.

I cant decide if I should use a curved or square dash, I also do not want to block the hole too much, so that it can double as a bed. Maybe with a reading light in each corner.

I would prefer the steering to be in the middle, can I do this, or should I make it to the left of the dash.?

Not sure is I want the wife next to me or behind., I suppose two sitting right in front will give better weight distribution. But with the steering in the middle, the two passengers can sit further forward and then the back two will have more legroom.

curtis5420
21-Oct-09, 06:32 PM
middle steering and seating

unless your mrs weighs the same as you (mine is slightly more bulky) then the craft will not be level.

also if someone is behind you they can see the way you lean into corners and copy you,

Ian Brooks
21-Oct-09, 07:10 PM
I like that one with all the lights and switches.

The steering idea is also practical, will have to do that too.

I cant decide if I should use a curved or square dash, I also do not want to block the hole too much, so that it can double as a bed. Maybe with a reading light in each corner.

I would prefer the steering to be in the middle, can I do this, or should I make it to the left of the dash.?

Not sure is I want the wife next to me or behind., I suppose two sitting right in front will give better weight distribution. But with the steering in the middle, the two passengers can sit further forward and then the back two will have more legroom.


Like many things, it'll come down to preference in the end. The Sev will take some degree of offset weight, but a person used to a small segment craft is likely to try to trim it level at all times - I do! But John R doesn't has his steering at the side per plans ad it seems to work fine. In general, the Sev is much less sensitive to trim than a segment skirted craft.

Ian

RussHudson
21-Oct-09, 08:15 PM
I put the steering on the left of my vanguard and generaly sit behind the wheel on the left, it levels out pretty well even with a full tank of fuel (30ltrs) which is on the same side...

Russ..

atters
22-Oct-09, 07:37 AM
Thanks for the advice, I think a middle steering is what I will go for. I am also going to use those plastic garden chairs that fold-up for seating, they are cumfy and when folded can store under the sides in the netting that will be fitted to keep stuff from moving around.

Being that I go out quite a lot on my own with the craft, the center steering should make for better visibility and a good feel for where the craft is and stuff. Plus I am going to build in a engine cover that could be hard to see past with the steering to the one side.

Started the long bits that travel the length of the craft last night. My table is too small to do the whole length at once. So I have done half, and will do the other half tomorrow and then join the two later.

Ian Brooks
22-Oct-09, 06:47 PM
Started the long bits that travel the length of the craft last night. My table is too small to do the whole length at once. So I have done half, and will do the other half tomorrow and then join the two later.

Check the plans carefully - I made my longerons 3.5" too long and didn't realise until late in the assembly, when I noticed the whole craft was 3.5" longer than it should be! Took 3 days to find out what had gone wrong, and how to re-design the skirt to cope with the new shape of the back end!

The longerons are not the full length of the craft - they are 3.5" shorter!

Ian

atters
23-Oct-09, 06:35 AM
Took my measurements from the craft to make sure.

John Robertson
23-Oct-09, 10:18 AM
Make sure the hull is dead square (no twist or bend) before you attach the coamings/longerons. Once they are attached the hull will become very stiff.

Its a better idea to build them (and the vertical dash supports) onto the hull before you flip it over - it will then be much stiffer and less likely to twist.