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ctsdesign
11-Feb-10, 02:29 AM
I see that some crafts are using a hydraulic motor to run the lift fan, In my mind I thought that fluid power adds weight, I want to get more into hydraulic setups, but don't really know where to start like the type of motor and pump needed, inlet/outlet sizes, rpm levels etc....can anyone help me out on this?

hector46
11-Feb-10, 12:11 PM
It's not used much in light hovercraft. There is one out there owned by a club member

Direct drive or belts work well and are light.

Steve

ctsdesign
11-Feb-10, 12:35 PM
It's not used much in light hovercraft. There is one out there owned by a club member

Direct drive or belts work well and are light.

Steve

So what type of motors are racers using for the lift fan, a 2 stroke, or a 4 stroke?

hector46
11-Feb-10, 04:43 PM
I am a cruiser not a racer. I'm sure some of the racers will be along soon to help. I'm surprised you can't find anything on here about it. It's power to weight with racing so not hard to guess what type of engine they use for lift on the non integrated craft.

Steve

Jon Pert
11-Feb-10, 05:32 PM
There a 2.5 (one got a bit smashed at the last meeting) race craft that use a hydraulic lift system. All of these are running the pump off of a GSXR750 thrust engine.

I'm sure Kevin will be along to fill you in shortly.

Lift engines in use range from Briggs and Stratton units on the F35 craft to Solo engines and Weslake drone engines. Other engines are used I have just pointed out the most popular.

Of course there is also the option of shaft drive.

foster2958
12-Feb-10, 07:43 PM
There is a thread in Builders Corner in the members area called "Hydraulics for Lift Fans" where I've attached an article about the system we've used on our race craft. In summary; less precision required than a shaft drive system consequently fairly quick and easy to install, about the same weight as a shaft drive (more or less), but not as flexible as a separate lift engine. Probably not the ideal solution for a cruiser. You do need to be careful when setting up hydraulics to exclude all the air - if any air gets in when you're running the oil quickly turns to mayonnaise and you lose all lift! That was Colin's problem at Towcester last year and the reason he wasn't on the same pace as Matt.

Kevin