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Brian G. Reynolds
12-Apr-10, 07:16 AM
Good morning all,

Did you all enjoy Summer this year on Saturday?...... Down hill from here....

What is the type thread we should use on our shirts namely for my Osprey?

When I went out on the Humber I had quite a few of the cable tie ends tear.....

B.

firth5731
12-Apr-10, 08:37 AM
nylon from k&m

falconer
12-Apr-10, 08:46 AM
I find black is the best although some nice effects can be made with white thread.....





ops oh yes and waterproof - ie nylon ;-)

curtis5420
12-Apr-10, 08:49 AM
i use thread i got from a friend who has a wind surfer sail making company.

it says on the bottom, 'FICORD-PA, 100% POLIAMIDA A.T, Nm 40/2'

peterd51
12-Apr-10, 12:49 PM
Hi,

were do you set out from to get onto the Humber please?

Who did you have to contact to get permission please?

Regards
Peter

KipMac
12-Apr-10, 04:30 PM
You want Barbour Terko Polyester Cotton Satin 50.
50 is the thread size. The higher the number the thinner the thread
Do not use plain cotton as it has a limited life and doesn't stretch.


There is plenty of info on Google but I have used the above since day one.

Regards, Kip

Brian G. Reynolds
12-Apr-10, 08:30 PM
Thank you all, as usual very informative.

Kip, where do you buy your stuff from, if it is not a trade secret that is!

When I fitted the new skirt to the Osprey it looked soooooooo clean and shiny I did not want to take it out of the barn!!!

But I did!

http://www.reynolds-towers.com/coppermine/displayimage.php?album=lastup&cat=103&pos=1 (http://www.reynolds-towers.com/coppermine/displayimage.php?album=lastup&cat=103&pos=1)

B

RussHudson
12-Apr-10, 09:06 PM
Hi,

were do you set out from to get onto the Humber please?

Who did you have to contact to get permission please?

Regards
Peter

Peter, we launch from the Humber SAR ramp under the bridge at Hessle.
You have to register with the SAR guys and pay for a key to the ramp, or come along when one of us with a key is going out :)
Gary will probably be along soon as he sorted it all out originally.

Russ..

Brian G. Reynolds
12-Apr-10, 10:30 PM
Hi Peter, please forgive me for pointing out a few issues and rules. I do not believe you are a club member so I will have to make a few assumptions..... I mean you no ills and would welcome you as a new member with open arms to what I believe is a great club!

There are a few HCGB members working very, very hard within the club to get us (hovercraft operators) permission to use the tidal waterways within this country of ours.

We operate under a strict code-of-conduct and are up against a few people that are doing there dammedest to get all PWC (Personal Water Craft) banned from everywhere.

As with all things in this country, it only takes one bad apple and we are all in trouble, please read our code of conduct notes and adhere to them.

If you go to the Humber Rescue site they will ask you to show your life jackets, VHF Radio, flares and an idea of what you intend to do.

I have only been there once under the guidance of Garry which is probably a good start, I am of course making assumptions as to your level of competence.

This sounds like I am preaching a bit here, please forgive me, I just do not want the hard work of the members to be spoilt.

If you are a member then once again I apologise, if you are not then please introduce yourself, we are mostly friendly and Garry is almost house trained!

Thank you, take care,

Brian.

firth5731
13-Apr-10, 04:05 PM
the humber is the most dangerous river in england.
i have seen several people removed from the river in body bags for various reasons.The water speed is 7 knots and there are miles of mud flatts and debris floating around,
the river is a major route and can get quite busy.
if you want to use the site that is fine however i feel you would be foolish to take the river lightly.
I passed a day skipper course,vhf and frequently fish the north sea and i still get nervous on the river.
If you want details of the site they are on the cruising forum which you can access in the members area.I intend to go quite allot this year and you are more than welcome to come.I usually post a message stating my intentions on the cruising forum.(a woft on the humber)
and see if anyone is playing out.
cheers gaz

peterd51
13-Apr-10, 08:04 PM
Hi,

thanks for the info. That's the wrong part of the river for me, too deep, too dangerous.

I was hoping you'd say off Cleethorpes beach, mud-flats, streams, not deep water. More to my liking. I'm not a sailor :-)

Regards
Peter

Jon Pert
14-Apr-10, 08:03 AM
Peter,

I would seriously consider joining the club so you have access to the members area. There is a wealth of very valuable information in there that will keep you safe and hovercrafting as a pastime safe as well.

You mention Cleethorpes beach. I presume (hope) you are only using this to launch from and then you will be gone from the area for a considerable amount of time. You will need permission to launch from there otherwise you will more than likely get a red faced beach warden chasing after you. We as a club are trying to steer people away from operating on a beach and nearly killing grannies and dogs and making a lot of noise etc. Launching from a beach and returning a few hours later after your trip would be fine once you have gained the permission of the beach warden.

Mud flats are great to explore on a hover but a word of warning. It is very difficult to see gullies that have been cut into the mud flats. You could be quite happily cruising along and then you will come across a gulley with a 4 foot drop, by then it will be too late and you will be going over the edge and landing in a heap. Just a word of warning, when operating on mud flats keep the speed low so that you can see well ahead of you.

Just a few words of advice for you.

Brian G. Reynolds
14-Apr-10, 12:27 PM
Funny thing you mention gullies...

When I was with Garry on the Humber we decided to head a bit down river and I was a bit ahead of Garry when I saw what looked to me to be a good mud river entrance on my left, I slowed down but had no idea if I should look at it or go past, so I went past..

When Garry reached it he had a look but decided not to try either.

A bit later I passed the same river entrance from the other direction and noticed there was a massive (4 foot ish... massive to me!) drop which I did not see from the other side!

Case in point!

I must point out to you avid readers that I am un-experienced in these sort of things so my motto is, if in doubt, don't do it!

Like they say in the aviation world, better to be on the ground wishing you were in the air than in the air wishing you were on the ground....

Ill shut up now!

B.

firth5731
14-Apr-10, 04:51 PM
mud is fantastic now i have a 2 engine craft.set the lift engine to low and not as much muck in the face,result .it is great also for sledging but you must be straight when you touch down for the slide or you will be straighter quicker than you think.

Bryan
14-Apr-10, 05:40 PM
Hurry!!!! I,m glad to read this sort of post. The advice given out is spot on. To all on lookers don,t be shy pay your membership and gather endless pages of great info. This will only help to inhance your hovercraft journey.
Maybe one day manufactures will give out the same info!!!! I won,t hold my breath.

Brian G. Reynolds
14-Apr-10, 07:48 PM
Peter, are you still there?

I hope this does not sound like we are having a pop at you? Completely the opposite!

I was going to try and get to the Humber this Saturday but I seem to have a lot of skirt segies waiting to be stitched!!!

The following w/e, 24th/25th Apr I am on the sea safety course at Allhallows, 200 miles away!

So when I do try again I should be able to give you a ride if you wish? You will always be welcome.

B.

firth5731
15-Apr-10, 02:55 PM
stitch the segs you lazy devil.. will take approx 5 mins

peterd51
15-Apr-10, 07:20 PM
Hi,

thanks for the info and the offer of a ride but I'm not interested in deep water. If I was I'd buy a boat!

The 'beach' at Cleethorpes is about six miles long and two or more miles out at low water. You don't get grannies or anyone else out there much. It's 'home-town' for me so I know my way around there.

Not that I'll be trying it out any time soon.

Regards
Peter

John Robertson
15-Apr-10, 08:06 PM
Hi,
The 'beach' at Cleethorpes is about six miles long and two or more miles out at low water. You don't get grannies or anyone else out there much. It's 'home-town' for me so I know my way around there.

Unfortunately the coast at Cleethorpes (like a lot of places around the UK) is designated under the European Habitats Directive and European Birds Directive. It's also a Site of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI). It is a criminal offence to damage or disturb designated features. I would reckon you are guaranteed to get "noticed" in an area like this.

A boat - surely not! All that hassle launching and mooring and not being able to get into shallow water - never mind the tides, wet feet and the fuel bill :) Far better with a hovercraft - you just skim straight onto the water and stop wherever you can skim back out of the water again - no worries about how deep the water is or what's under the surface.

Brian G. Reynolds
16-Apr-10, 10:17 PM
stitch the segs you lazy devil.. will take approx 5 mins

Okay Garry, you win!!!

I have fired up the sewing machine in the barn tonight and have tried t get it to work correctly....

I think I might have sorted it!!!!!

Is there no end my cleverness.....

B.

kach22i
18-May-10, 10:07 PM
http://www.reynolds-towers.com/coppermine/displayimage.php?album=lastup&cat=103&pos=1 (http://www.reynolds-towers.com/coppermine/displayimage.php?album=lastup&cat=103&pos=1)

What the heck am I looking at?

What are those tubes for?

http://www.reynolds-towers.com/coppermine/albums/hovercraft/osprey/pre-season-servicing-2010/anti_plow_03.JPG

kevthehover
18-May-10, 10:15 PM
What are those tubes for?

Surface to Air Misiles .......lolhttp://www.hovercraft.org.uk/images/icons/icon10.gif

Philip
18-May-10, 10:15 PM
Tubes? They are "Trev Pipes"!! The ones in the pic maybe too short to work well.

kach22i
18-May-10, 10:25 PM
Tubes? They are "Trev Pipes"!! The ones in the pic maybe too short to work well.
Work well at what?

trev
18-May-10, 11:57 PM
Ha ha Trev pipes!;)
I think you may be right Philip they look a bit on the short side

Brian the idea is that the pipes allow the air to pass down the tubes to the bottom of the hull when plough in happens the tubes need to go to the bottom like this
http://www.hovercraft.org.uk/picture.php?albumid=64&pictureid=1002
Flush with the bottom of the hull so the air gets under the hull and helps to lubricate the underneath and prevent it from being sucked down onto the water and stopping.

kach22i
I fitted the pipes to my Osprey 5 last year and it worked well the craft did try to plough but it always popped back onto hover with no real slow down or plough in sudden stops.

Trev

kach22i
19-May-10, 12:18 AM
kach22i
I fitted the pipes to my Osprey 5 last year and it worked well the craft did try to plough but it always popped back onto hover with no real slow down or plough in sudden stops.

Trev
Trev, that looks like an interesting concept. Could you post a link to the original thread so that I can get caught up?

FYI: a couple of years ago I played around in the same area on my Scat II and came up with this: I'm about to rip 75% of it out - trying something new again.
http://s184.photobucket.com/albums/x295/kach22i/?start=20
http://i184.photobucket.com/albums/x295/kach22i/HOLE-2.jpg
http://i184.photobucket.com/albums/x295/kach22i/10-Things-To-Do.jpg
http://i184.photobucket.com/albums/x295/kach22i/SPLIT-12.jpg
http://i184.photobucket.com/albums/x295/kach22i/HOLE-5.jpg

http://i184.photobucket.com/albums/x295/kach22i/HULL1.jpg
http://i184.photobucket.com/albums/x295/kach22i/FILL4.jpg
http://i184.photobucket.com/albums/x295/kach22i/HULL3.jpg
http://i184.photobucket.com/albums/x295/kach22i/HULL-OFF-CLOTH.jpg
http://i184.photobucket.com/albums/x295/kach22i/Imgp5425.jpg

Brian G. Reynolds
19-May-10, 11:34 AM
Hi all, they were originally longer but then I can not get it off the trailer anymore!

I was told to make sure they are below the skirt segments, so I interpreted that as below the skirt segments when they are laying flat on the hull.

I thought when the skirt collapses the segments cover the air feed holes so these pipes allow the air to escape below the segments...If that makes sense…

I have to admit that so far the only time I have felt plow-in was at the hovercraft museum in the bad weather on the last day…

If they need to be longer than that I will remove them totally.

B.

trev
20-May-10, 06:24 PM
Hi Brian
the pipe has to be longer than the skirt contact point pulled back against the hull so the air can get to the bottom of the hull, Leave them on and see how it goes at Loch Fyne

kach22i
There is no original thread it was a article in a 20 year old HCGB mag that I read and decided to try my version of how i thought it could work with pipe I had lying around.
You know the score, some hovercraft owners try there ideas out to see if it works and you have tried out more radical modifications than most of us :) I have to ask ,the skirt on your scat is it a improvement on the original segmented skirt Ie does your craft perform better now than a standard scat

Trev

kach22i
20-May-10, 11:32 PM
I have to ask ,the skirt on your scat is it a improvement on the original segmented skirt Ie does your craft perform better now than a standard scat

Trev
No improvement yet - far from it, in fact because I left the cover off one winter the foam soaked up a lot of water and the craft is way overweight now. I never got the flow and pressures right on the drape & bag skirt. As of last summer the craft has a sort of mini finger system with air flow from the bag. I'm planning on ripping out a lot of the work - anything which restricts the flow like those HVAC pipes is going in the recycle bin.

I have "3 pipes" or landing skids which are hollow vinyl tubes running down the middle of my craft at the plow plane. It was not intended to have air running through it. I did it to avoid crushing of a transverse bag skirt just aft of the bow (tucked on top of the milk crates). In retrospect it could have acted similar to your pipes had I left the ends unsealed.

Photos taken today:
http://s184.photobucket.com/albums/x295/kach22i/Hovercraft%20Random%20Pics/
http://i184.photobucket.com/albums/x295/kach22i/Hovercraft%20Random%20Pics/FT1.jpg
http://i184.photobucket.com/albums/x295/kach22i/Hovercraft%20Random%20Pics/FT2.jpg
3-Pipes
http://i184.photobucket.com/albums/x295/kach22i/Hovercraft%20Random%20Pics/FT3.jpg

kach22i
22-May-10, 03:01 PM
back to the original topic.....Sewing

I used 60 pound moss green SpiderWire (fishing line), hand sewn to reinforce heat welded seams on my thermal polyurethane skirt. The material required no reinforcement new, but after sitting around for a year in my basement it just would not iron up to full strength anymore. Also bonding to the fabric on the craft already weathered and exposed to UV rays had even weaker bonds, so I added spot point fasteners composed of plastic button-like automotive fasteners and aluminum washers pushed over the threaded ribs.
5472http://www.hovercraft.org.uk/images/misc/pencil.png