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sweetm2369
13-May-10, 06:23 PM
http://www.kentonline.co.uk/kentonline/news/2010/may/13/swan_unperturbed_bird.aspx

Councillor says "it sounds like a high volume strimmer"

Found on local news website!

Derek Sweetman

Brian G. Reynolds
13-May-10, 09:00 PM
What is it with some people!

I remember the Police being called to Gang-Warily when I was marshalling, They were told we were upsetting the ducks.... I saw 2 ducks come out of the water, casually walk (waddle?) over to the fastest part of the track, lay down, tuck their heads on their backs and go to sleep!!!

And they were not wearing wrist bands either!!!!!

Pathetic....

B.

Ann in orange
14-May-10, 05:04 PM
I think the fact that we sometimes have to stop racing in order to send someone out to herd swans off the racing line proves that they are not bothered about hovercraft!

rawson5405
14-May-10, 09:14 PM
Leave us alone we love watching the racing .we enjoyed Towcester .
Mr Swan:lol:
4573

rawson5405
14-May-10, 09:20 PM
By the way my mates in the next door enjoyed it as well

trev
14-May-10, 10:57 PM
The last time I had a swan encounter was on a island on Loch Lomand, the hover was sitting on the shore line with the engine running. The two swans waddled up to the back of the hover,turned there backs to the fan thrust to allow there feathers to be blown back and allowed them to have a good clean up deep down in there feathers with there beaks.

Now that's a service to wildlife.

I have also noticed that sea birds feeding on the shore line, If a hovercraft passes over a feeding ground the birds will fly up as you approach and then land as you pass and continue to feed, its a minor inconvenience to them unlike a bird of prey turning up the whole flock would leave the area and this would disrupt feeding.

There will always be someone ready to moan about a hovercraft, Its Human nature some are wingers, some are not:rolleyes:

Trev

daly5546
15-May-10, 07:31 AM
I have also noticed that sea birds feeding on the shore line, If a hovercraft passes over a feeding ground the birds will fly up as you approach and then land as you pass and continue to feed, its a minor inconvenience to them unlike a bird of prey turning up the whole flock would leave the area and this would disrupt feeding.


Trev[/QUOTE]

When you see a tractor ploughing, the seagulls have the same motion.

sweetm2369
15-May-10, 07:50 AM
I have also noticed that sea birds feeding on the shore line, If a hovercraft passes over a feeding ground the birds will fly up as you approach and then land as you pass and continue to feed, its a minor inconvenience to them unlike a bird of prey turning up the whole flock would leave the area and this would disrupt feeding.


Trev

When you see a tractor ploughing, the seagulls have the same motion.[/QUOTE]

This phenomenon I believe is what allowed Pegwell Bay Hoverport to be built alongside a bird sanctuary although I have not been able to find the report in the public enquiry records that states this.
The hovercraft at Pegwell also had the bonus that they encouraged more worms to the surface for the birds to feed on!

Derek

sweetm2369
15-May-10, 08:09 AM
There were, of course, objectors at Pegwell Bay of whom the
most strident were worms and birds, or those promoting
their interests! Pegwell Bay was an important site treasured by
local fishermen for harvesting worms. The fishing lobby’s
initial response was, to put it mildly, unhelpful. But trials
unearthed – quite literally – a curious phenomenon. After the
hovercraft passed over the mudflats the worms popped up,
no doubt wondering what the devil all the noise and
disturbance was, and were more easily harvested. This proved
a bonus point which won over the fishermen. A somewhat
similar experience occurred with the birds. The Bay was
adjacent to an important bird sanctuary and every
ornithologist in the land – bar one – was paraded to convince
the Inspector that the demise of the sanctuary was inevitable
if operation of the hovercraft was permitted. The odd one
out -the Applicant’s expert witness - stuck to his guns and on
the trials conducted as part of the Inspector’s site visit it was
observed that when a hovercraft passed over the Bay the birds
in question, feeding happily on the worms which had popped
up, would rise gently from the water (or mud according to
the tides) and then drop leisurely back down to resume their
predatory activities. Game, set and match to the hovercraft!

gavinparson
15-May-10, 10:37 AM
I remember racing at Whittlesey where there was a large flock of roosting gulls which took off when we approached them and as soon as we'd passed they'd land again. And that continued for every lap and every race. It didn't seem to bother them at all.

Ian Brooks
15-May-10, 11:10 AM
I have done a study on the effects of hovercraft operations on the environment, digging out all the available research on the subject, including a good deal of research into birds & bird disturbance - all done for the Weston bid. This results in a 30 page report, more than 20 references, etc, etc. This is required by the Habitats Regulations for any new activity in a SSSI, SAC, Ramsar etc.

This research says that hovercraft have virtually no impact on the environment excepting CO2 and noise. Bird disturbance issues can be mitigated by simple actions that are conistant with hovercraft operations

The upshot is that bird disturbance is not an issue so long as there is adequate food for the birds, and the disturbance is not continuous. The only time this might be an issue is in the late winter (Dec-March) when food might be scarce and constant disturbance can prevent feeding. Even in winter, bird populations can stand up to one disturbance per 2 hours with no significant effect on bird mortality.

This is one reason why we should never dwell in one area with our craft, it's the "messing about" that causes problems for birds (and people), not "cruising" where we are here & gone.

This research can be modified for other areas with a little work. If anyone needs a copy, let me know.

Ian

kach22i
16-May-10, 01:22 AM
I have had a negative reaction from people living on inland lakes I think mostly because the hovercraft sounds different, which they then equate to being loud. As a test I had my friend who owned a house on the lake stand with me on shore as another friend took my craft out. The home owner said it was loud once before, which I did not understand the full meaning of. Together we could barely hear the craft over the jet skis and power boats, that is until the tail was pointing straight back at us, then it just sounded like a vacuum cleaner off in the distance.

I then turned to my home owner friend and said; does that sound loud to you?

He said, well I didn't meant to say loud, I meant to say certainly different, it gets your attention.

And that my friends in the end is what it is all about for some people. Different = Bad in their minds, not a whole lot is going to change that other than some more exposure and education.

John Robertson
16-May-10, 06:10 PM
Video clip taken today - with plenty of swans on the river
http://www.hovercraft.org.uk/showthread.php?p=68316#post68316

Everyone needs to be aware of birds of all types at certain times of the year - basically the over-wintering and nesting seasons. During both of these times disturbance can be a matter of life or death for some species.

Ian Brooks
16-May-10, 07:09 PM
Everyone needs to be aware of birds of all types at certain times of the year - basically the over-wintering and nesting seasons. During both of these times disturbance can be a matter of life or death for some species.

I think this is something that I could usefully produce a educational article on... as John says, there are things we should all be aware of in order to prevent unnecessary damage to bird populations. Who knows what a Ramsar is? A SPA? SAC? What exactly have the Habs Regs got to do with Hovercrafting? The truth is, these things all have to be taken care of if we are to live harmoniously with our twtiching naighbours, and to avoid being fined for upsetting the lesser spotted wading roadrunner (Accelleratii Incredibus) or the like.

I'll put something together - in a few weeks, going to be busy hovering for a bit!

Ian

John Robertson
16-May-10, 08:42 PM
The upside of taking care around wildlife is that you get to see things that very few other people see.

These pics was taken last year of a hovercraft operating within a few metres of nesting seabirds (gulls, shags and cormorants (I think :o) on an island 0.5 mile offshore- they aren't used to people). It clearly shows that wild birds tolerate hovercraft without significant disturbance (If you keep very still you can actually get within 3 metres) . There are NO birds in the air in these pics!

4575
4576
4577

I don't think many people have had the privilege of getting this close to wildlife!

kach22i
16-May-10, 11:10 PM
Beautiful photos, you must be hovering in pairs to get the pictures.

Was the other craft of Sevtec design as well?

John Robertson
18-May-10, 07:09 AM
Beautiful photos, you must be hovering in pairs to get the pictures.

Was the other craft of Sevtec design as well?

Yes, I'd just passed by the same place. And my craft was also a Sev (there's a clue in my avatar :P~:-P~:razz:).

kach22i
18-May-10, 09:26 PM
Maybe all hovercraft near birds need to be quite cruisers like the Sevtec.

I've done a lot to quiet down my Scat II, but it's still a two stoke with a 30 inch fan.