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View Full Version : Can anyone tell me what make this old craft might be?



crusty
27-Jan-11, 06:04 AM
It's in poor condition but it does run fine.
The engines a VW and it has flexabile drive shafts to both props, the rear variable pitch.
I'd like to bring it back to it's former glory.
I'm good with fibreglass and mechanicals but as far as making skirts I'm baffled (but thats later)
I wish it had the old skirts so I could understand more.
I live in northern Australia and the nearest craft that i know of is a 2 hour plane ride away.
Soo after being a lurker for the last week you guys seem quite helpfull to others so I joined.
I live on a 50 acre block and have been getting stranded by water every wet season for 21 years(thats how long i've wanted a hovercraft)

My names Gary and i'm 50 and retired and I hope the piccy works
Looking forward to hearing from you peeps
Question 1,, what are those arms running down the sides? an electric engine raises and lowers them.
http://img163.imageshack.us/img163/2249/h11q.jpg (http://img163.imageshack.us/i/h11q.jpg/)

Keith Oakley
27-Jan-11, 07:20 AM
Welcome to the HCGB. It isn't a British design so I'd assume its Australian or possibly US. It's a very unusual design. I'm guessing those arms on the side are a kind of retractable solid skirt or sidewall. A sidewall craft has two solid sides to the air cushion which extend down into the water. The British HM2 is a classic 50? seat example from the 70s. In the HM2 the sides are fixed thus the craft can only really operate over water. However it does limit the side slipping that a conventional craft has when turning. Is there any sign of a fabric skirt at the front or the back of the cushion? - or possibly a brush skirt (I have vague memories of a US craft that might fit). I bet someone else can help more!

Keith

edenfeldt
27-Jan-11, 08:00 AM
Now thatís an old one...:) I am not sure i would call it a hovercraft, its something in-between a hovercraft and an airboat if i have understood it right. Its a CushionFlight 240.

Specifications

Engine: Volkswagen 1600cc, 4cylinder, 4cycle, air-cooled.
Dimensions & Capacity: 146 length, 66 Width, 49 height, 425lb payload, 670lb unladen weight.

Performance: 30mph over water, 40 mph over land, climbs a 20% grade, hovers 2 to 4 above surface, carrys 2 adults, zero turning radius, 3.8 gallons per hour at cruise.
Construction: All Fiberglass construction, sealed twin hull serves as floatation tanks.
Note RevFlight Model 240 is coast-guard approved and licensed as a boat.

The brush like things on the side that can be lowered and raised is the skirt...i donít know how it works exactly. Looks like it could be a fun project but i dont think you could expect the same performance as an ordinary hovercraft with finger or bag skirts.

Good luck and remember that googel is your friend, spend an hour or two just searching on CushionFlight 240 and you will probably find some useful information. Sorry i could not be of more help.

Regards

Mats Edenfeldt
Sweden


It's in poor condition but it does run fine.
The engines a VW and it has flexabile drive shafts to both props, the rear variable pitch.
I'd like to bring it back to it's former glory.
I'm good with fibreglass and mechanicals but as far as making skirts I'm baffled (but thats later)
I wish it had the old skirts so I could understand more.
I live in northern Australia and the nearest craft that i know of is a 2 hour plane ride away.
Soo after being a lurker for the last week you guys seem quite helpfull to others so I joined.
I live on a 50 acre block and have been getting stranded by water every wet season for 21 years(thats how long i've wanted a hovercraft)

My names Gary and i'm 50 and retired and I hope the piccy works
Looking forward to hearing from you peeps
Question 1,, what are those arms running down the sides? an electric engine raises and lowers them.
http://img163.imageshack.us/img163/2249/h11q.jpg (http://img163.imageshack.us/i/h11q.jpg/)

Philip
27-Jan-11, 08:44 AM
60096010

Here's the info from 1968.

SachaR
27-Jan-11, 10:01 AM
Have a look here:

http://cushionflight.tripod.com/

Al
27-Jan-11, 11:32 AM
If those brushes work it would certainly save a lot of skirt repairs.

It would be good to find out more info on using brushes as a skirt. Has anyone on here ever used them or know anything about how a hover would handle with brushes?

Hovertrekker
27-Jan-11, 12:33 PM
I saw one of these for sale in California in 1980. The side brush skirts looked very odd and it didn't look like it would hover well. The owner didn't want to take it off the trailer.

Al
27-Jan-11, 02:42 PM
I can think of one advantage of using brushes rather than a bag skirt on a cruising craft would be, not having to empty the bag of water after being afloat for a while, obviously less wear & tear on tarmac & rough ground.

I wonder about the amount of wasted air leaking through the skirt though.

crusty
28-Jan-11, 03:11 AM
Well, I'm Astounded, and here I was wondering how I was going to make and fit skirts when they where right in front of me. Now I know what it is I have some direction. Thanks for your help guys, I'll let you know how it goes, I'm worried about wasted air too, I hope it hovers.

HoverTim
28-Jan-11, 12:45 PM
From a model point of viw a firend of mine uses shagpile/fleece for a skirt lift is provided by a car air con unit and it workes well but will not work on the water