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barrin5657
6-Jul-11, 06:59 PM
How long do you have to stay in the water till the rescue boat picks you up.
"I am a watcher and not a racer"

Winst
6-Jul-11, 07:51 PM
How long do you have to stay in the water till the rescue boat picks you up.

All depends on how long your craft stay's afloat!!!!................................(W)

KipMac
6-Jul-11, 07:51 PM
The answer is in your question.
"Till the rescue boat picks you up"

Sorry but I couldn't resist it. I will now sit in the naughty corner for 10 minutes.

Kip

Ewan Black
6-Jul-11, 08:11 PM
The rescue boat doesn't deploy while craft are racing- in other words if you are in the water, safe and not putting anyone else at risk, you can stay there. If not conscious, seriously sinking or compromising the racing line, then a Red Flag will be called to enable to boat to operate safely.

Better- get back in the craft!

broad5186
7-Jul-11, 03:45 PM
it can be almost the duration fo a race as in the case of my daughter at Hackett Lakes a couple of weeks ago - she fell in 1/2 a lap into the race and stayed there with the craft until almost the end when the race was Red flagged for another swimmer who was suspected injured - the second swimmer was rescued first, then my daughter, then the craft itself so the craft had been floating for 15 mins or so (and didn't sink cos there's plenty buoyancy in them)

so you can be in there a while

Tony

barrin5657
7-Jul-11, 06:25 PM
The answer is in your question.
"Till the rescue boat picks you up"

Sorry but I couldn't resist it. I will now sit in the naughty corner for 10 minutes.

Kip

Hope your craft will float for more than 10minutes most of the craft at hacket's did not and the driver had to get out lucky they where not injured that was the point in quest'ion

Jon Pert
7-Jul-11, 07:22 PM
The marshals are very good at spotting an injured, or potentially injured person. The craft should float, full stop, it is your life raft afterall. If you know it doesn't then be prepared to lose it or swim a fair distance!

broad5186
7-Jul-11, 07:26 PM
the problem we have is it's difficult to scrutineer buoyancy, all craft should not sink and driver declares amount of buoyancy at initial scrutiny, craft also has to pass a 5 minute floatation test but the truth is a craft can pass this if it is simply watertight

too many craft out there have inadequate buoyancy

tony

Jon Pert
7-Jul-11, 07:28 PM
too many craft out there have inadequate buoyancy

tony

This!

Float test should be 10 minutes and should be done every year, not just once at initial scrutineering. IMHO.

KipMac
7-Jul-11, 07:50 PM
This has been a controversial subject for decades.
The only way to test if a craft floats is to TOTALLY flood it which may be a water level just about or above the engine carb intake.

Not a very desirable test just before practice!!

The scrutineers have NO choice but to accept the word of the craft owner.

If it sinks it is your problem apart from possible pollution from escaping fuel,etc.
Any craft I have ever built will float for 10 years let alone 10 minutes.
Kip

hover snapper
8-Jul-11, 07:09 AM
it can be almost the duration fo a race as in the case of my daughter at Hackett Lakes a couple of weeks ago - she fell in 1/2 a lap into the race and stayed there with the craft until almost the end when the race was Red flagged for another swimmer who was suspected injured - the second swimmer was rescued first, then my daughter, then the craft itself so the craft had been floating for 15 mins or so (and didn't sink cos there's plenty buoyancy in them)

so you can be in there a while

Tony
tony I dont think the second swimmer was rescued first. they managed to get back in the craft themself.
pretty sure they went for laura first.

broad5186
8-Jul-11, 10:49 PM
oh yes - i remember now - but they did leave my craft out there whilst they took laura in with her injured shoulder - huh - priorities please, craft first so dad can get ready for the next race :)

Del Smart
11-Jul-11, 06:49 PM
From the point of view of an x racer and experienced racer and now boat recovery crew, we keep an eye on evey swimmer and try to access if they may be injured, unconscious or healthy and able to restart. The red flag has to be called to allow the boat to safely deploy. If the driver seems to be ok and the craft is stable and not blocking the course then the judgement call is to allow racing to continue.

The main point is to look after the driver first,keeping in mind the safety of boat crew, marshalls and the other drivers and then to recover the craft afterwards unless the driver is fit enough to help recovr thier own craft.

The hardest decision is whether or not to red flag a race, so we usually pause for thought and access the situation. All marshalls are on radio and rely on each other to relay information and make the very hard judgement calls when one of the drivers gets it wrong.

Hope that helps

The wet orange one !

Del Smart

pkfusion
12-Jul-11, 01:46 PM
I raced 1977-81 and this conversation could be from then! My eccles would float waterlogged, BUT, the rear, including the ducts, would be completely under water. I seem to remember the drill was to jump out into the water, swim round the back, and tread water holding the back of the craft up!! And I built mine with a foam sandwidge floor to help with stiffness and boyancy.
So, the craft passed scrutineering because it would float, but that didn't help much in any practical way other than being able to see the front 18 inches of the hull to know where it was!!